‘A Better Way Forward’ – Health and Social Care Conference 2019

Originally published by Social Enterprise UK: www.socialenterprise.org.uk

With the publication of the NHS’ Long Term Plan and the imminent arrival of the long-awaited Social Care Green Paper, health and social care policy is starting to become clearer.

Join us at our Health and Social Care Conference: A Better Way Forward, taking place in London on 16 May, where an impressive list of speakers will explore the impact of these policies on the role of social enterprises.

We will see how social enterprises are well placed to lead on innovative thinking and to demonstrate how to work with communities and with local people. Chair of NHS Improvement, Baroness Dido Harding will be delivering a keynote in the morning focusing on the Social Care Green Paper and NHS Long Term Plan. Simon Devonshire OBE, Entrepreneur in Residence at the National Physical Laboratory, will also inspire delegates with his talk on digital advances to improve health and social care.

Workshops led by subject experts will delve into the realities and benefits of measuring social impact, provide practical tips on increasing your digital working, look at the opportunities provided by social prescribing; and give guidance on understanding contracts and funding opportunities.

Come along and contribute to discussions on current policy, be inspired by innovations, and take away practical advice to help drive you and your organisation forward.

Book tickets

The conference is of interest to health and social care social enterprises, charities, housing associations, NHS commissioners, local authorities, private providers and all those involved in supporting social enterprises.

Author: Steering Member
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Categories: News

Regulator publishes guidance for charities linked to non-charitable organisations

Originally published by charitytimes: www.charitytimes.com


Written by Lauren Weymouth
29/03/19

The Charity Commission has published new guidance for charities, urging them to ensure any close relationships with non-charitable organisations are made clear to the public.

It comes amid concerns that some relationships between charities and non-charities have damaged public confidence in charity, the regulator said.

Charities are being told to ensure people outside of their charity understand the relationship with non-charitable organisations is not used to advance non-charitable agendas and interests.

The Charity Commission said its casework identified examples where charities have not managed their links to non-charitable organisations with care, in some cases allowing charities to be misused to further non-charitable interests, including commercial or private interests.

It said whilst it recognises that many charities work successfully in close partnership with a wide variety of non-charitable organisations, such as trading subsidiaries, the guidance is designed to help charities reap the benefits whilst also managing the risks carefully.

The guidance will also allow it, and the public, to better hold charities to account against existing rules, the regulator added.

The new guidance draws together relevant law and practice in setting out six principles to help trustees ensure their arrangements for working with a linked body secure the charity’s interests and independence.

Commenting on the guidance, Charity Commission CEO, Helen Stephenson said: “As regulator, we want charities to thrive and inspire trust, and we know relationships with non-charitable organisations can help a charity deliver on its purposes. But operating alongside other organisations should always be well-considered and trustees must manage the risks that can arise carefully, and with probity.

“Charities hold special status in society and the public rightly have high expectations of them, including that they are driven only by their charitable mission and purpose and that they work to defend and promote their independence from non-charitable organisations at all times.

“No charity should ever use or be used by non-charitable organisations to pursue uncharitable interests.”

The guidance is available on gov.uk and includes an infographic and checklist to help trustees check and review their approach.

Author: Steering Member
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Categories: News

Collaborators sought to connect the system

Content from Essex Future News


The Essex Strategic Co-ordination Group (ESCG) has been working hard over the past two years to facilitate whole-system working, foster collaborative relationships and support Essex Partners, and the Essex Assembly to deliver the county’s ambitions set out in The Future of Essex.

Chaired by Ian Davidson, CEO Tendring District Council and Chair of Safer Essex, the ESCG plays a key role in joining up countywide strategies and work delivered in partnership by capturing and disseminating system learning; identifying and addressing barriers to whole system working; and facilitating and promoting engagement and communication.

With representatives from health, Local Authorities, voluntary and community sector, Police, OPFCC and Essex County Fire and Rescue Services, the Group proactively develops links to, and improves integration with, formal partnership bodies throughout Essex.

ESCG has played a role in developing the Joint Health and Wellbeing Strategy, overseeing the JSNA, and supporting the delivery of the eight Future of Essex projects

The group is currently seeking additional representation on the group from health and economic growth partners. Meetings are held every eight weeks, if you would like to join the group, submit items for the agenda, or would like more information on the group please contact [email protected]

 

Author: Steering Member
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Categories: News

Addressing the needs of an ageing population

Content from Essex Future News


Leaders united at the Essex Assembly on 5 March to participate in future needs planning to support people to enjoy life long into old age.

Delegates participated in workshops to; tackle avoidable physical and mental illnesses; promote independence through innovation; support carers; design healthy places; prevent isolation; increase employment opportunities; encourage learning and; adopt a whole system leadership approach to effecting sustainable change.

More than 130 attendees heard from the Assembly’s first ever expert panel, hosted by Cllr John Spence, Chair of the Essex Health and Wellbeing Board. The panel provided some insight into how the many and changing needs of our ageing population can be addressed to support citizens in relation to employment expectations, social care, active communities and education, to enable independent, healthy, safer lives.

A number of recommendations including; pursuing an Essex Charter Mark for employers; supporting recruitment into old age; and evaluating the impact of technology to support independence into old age, will be taken forward to the Essex Strategic Coordination Group.

You can read the highlights, actions and recommendations from the workshops, as well as view the Q&A from the Expert Panel here.

Author: Steering Member
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Categories: News

Maximising the potential of future communities

Content from Essex Future News


A range of national experts are set to join senior leaders in Essex throughout the next six months to consider the implications and opportunities arising from major new developments in the county.

The Essex Communities programme has been commissioned by Essex Partners to engage the system in debate and discussion on the steps that we can take to maximise the economic, community and public health potential of new places.

The programme launched on 5 March with a keynote address to the Essex Assembly on the importance of adopting a whole system approach to designing new communities, collaborating with developers and exploring innovation.

Prof Rachel Cooper, President of the Design Research Society, described the human, material and financial factors that help to determine the success of a place and promote healthy outcomes for future communities. Rachel challenged us all to get involved early on in these discussions, and to be creative in engaging our communities in the design of our future places. You can view Rachel’s slides here

Exploring the potential of technology

The second workshop in the Essex Communities series; The power of technology: what does this mean for public services in new communities? will take place on 25 April, in Chelmsford, facilitated by NESTA. Attendees will explore how technology might shape the planning and design of new communities, and how this might influence future lifestyles, improve outcomes and reshape the relationship between people and public services.

The Essex Communities programme will be delivered during Apr-Sept 2019 to encourage Essex leaders to shape the choices made in designing major new developments to:

  • Have a positive impact on economic, social and health-related outcomes;
  • Create opportunities to develop new models of public service delivery; and
  • Help address long-term service pressures.

If you would like to know more, please contact [email protected]

 

Author: Steering Member
Posted:
Categories: News

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Author: Steering Member
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Categories: Funding, Opportunities

JustGiving scraps 5% fee for UK charities

Originally published by charitytimes: www.charitytimes.com


Written by Charity Times staff writer
26/03/19

JustGiving has scrapped its 5 per cent fee for charities in the UK, in the company’s biggest model shake-up since inception.

The online giving platform will be completely free for UK charities and will instead rely on voluntary contributions from donors to support the operation of the platform – a move designed to increase choice for donors and income for charities.

JustGiving’s decision follows the removal of platform fees for all crowdfunding, disasters and major incidents, which JustGiving announced in October last year.

“Today, JustGiving is taking an exciting step into the future by removing our platform fee. This change means lower costs for charities, transparency and choice for their supporters, and a sustainable future for the UK’s biggest and best platform for giving,” JustGiving general manager, Keith Williams said.

“We believe that people who donate through JustGiving money will be going to their chosen charity, and by making a voluntary contribution to the UK’s most-trusted giving platform we can continue to help charities and individuals raise even more money for good causes. That’s why we’re putting more power in the hands of our donors.”

In October 2018, JustGiving also announced a consultation regarding its Gift Aid reclaim service, which aims to allow charities to save money and time when reclaiming Gift Aid through the platform.

Following the consultation, JustGiving has announced it is changing its terms of service to allow charities to opt out of the Gift Aid reclaim service if they wish.

“JustGiving helps many charities, particularly smaller organisations, to focus their efforts on fundraising rather than on paperwork,” Charity Tax Group finance regulatory and taxes manager, Richard Bray said.

“The Charity Tax Group welcomes this contribution to the charity sector and looks forward to continuing to work with JustGiving to help future-proof Gift Aid as we move into an increasingly digital age.”

Author: Steering Member
Posted:
Categories: News